Perler Mario Question Block Tutorial

27 Sep

Hi everyone! I’ve posted my Mario question block a couple places and it seems to be pretty popular, so I figured I’d do a tutorial!

First off, the finished product(s)! (and a few more exclamation points!!)

Small box

Large box. Yes, I realize I made a tiny mistake, I don’t care anymore ;-P

Directions

I made both of these boxes using Perler beads, they’re great little fusible beads that you melt together with an iron. Hama beads are basically the same thing just a different brand. You’ll also need a huge embroidery needle, as long as you can find, and coordinating embroidery thread. I chose dark brown thread for both boxes. You may also need a large paper clip, slightly unbent, to push your needle through all the way.

First, decide if you want to make the large box or the small box! Patterns are below. Also decide if you want a functional lid or just a cute, non-functioning box. Next, iron all the pieces for your box as shown on the pattern, making sure not to iron too much, you want to be able to thread your giant needle through the holes. Remember that some of the pieces might look wrong if you flip them upside down so check before you freak out and disassemble them (don’t you all like how you can learn from my mistakes?? I did that like 3 times when I didn’t need to). I like to put my freshly ironed pieces under something sort of heavy, like a book, to make sure that they cool flat.

If you want to make a lid, make one square outline that is one peg smaller on all sides (for example, if you do the small box, make one square that’s 12×12 in addition to those found on the pattern). Using your iron and ironing paper, carefully melt the sides of your smaller square so that it will fit snugly within a normal-sized square; be careful to make sure you can still thread your needle through the holes.

When you’ve made all of your pieces, line them up and make sure they look correct. If you want a lid, take the top piece and your smaller piece and keep them separate. If you’re doing just a simple box, you can toss a bell inside before stitching so that it makes a noise similar to the sound in makes in Mario when the block is hit. If you’re electronically-inclined you could make something that will play the actual Mario sound when the box is moved and stitch it up inside the box!

Thread your needle with a long piece of embroidery thread and tie a double-, triple-, or even quadruple-knot at one end, just make sure the knot will be able to fit in the hole without slipping out. Making sure to keep your pieces properly aligned, thread the needle all the way through all pieces using the running stitch method and carefully push your knot into one of the little holes, this will keep it secure, just don’t push it too far. Go all the way around your box with a running stitch in one direction first. If your needle isn’t long enough you might need to carefully push it through with the paper clip; make sure you don’t stab yourself! When you reach the end of your thread, tie a large knot as close to your box as possible and push it into the hole the same way you did at the beginning. Once you’ve gone all the way around with your running stitch, reverse and go all the way back to make it look nice, neat, and keep it secure. For the lid, stitch it the exact same way only placing the small square in the center of the larger square so it fits properly.

That’s it! Pretty simple but a little time-consuming. I use my boxes to hold spare change, quite fitting for a Mario block I think.

Patterns

These are all of the pieces you’ll need to make the blocks. For the first and last pieces shown for each pattern, make those as full squares. For all other pieces they’re only square outlines, nothing in the center. Some of the beads are white, keep that in mind when making your outlines, I should have figured out a way to differentiate between “white” and “nothing”. Oh well!

Large box pattern

Small box pattern

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